English

Mårdseleforsens

Café & Restaurang

 

En del av Aurora Borealis HB

 

Telefon: 073-0933 006

Within the reserve area are

a total of nearly 40 large and small islands with a mosaic of features caused by the waters slow erosion of the rock - potholes, dry channels and rocky outcrops. Numerous smaller streams and rapids connect with the Vindelälven river on it's journey to the coast.

 

This island ecosystem is continuously affected by the varying water levels of the river, leading to a rich biodiversity of flora. The larger islands, whilst dominated by old conifer forest, are also home to alpine plants such as Northern Wolfsbane, Alpine Yellow-Violet, Mountain Timothy,

Wild Celery and Alpine Sow-Thistle.

The seeds of these plants most likely float downstream from high in the mountains.

Mårdseleforsen Nature Reserve

 

Mårdsele rapids, Lower Siksele and Siksele rapids, together with Storliden hill, make up the area known as 'Mårdseleforsen Nature reserve'. The pristine Vindelälven river flows through a rich landscape of ancient Pine and Spruce trees, watched over by Storliden hill which rises 656 feet above the river.

 

The nature reserve of Mårdselforsen is one of only two places where the primeval forest remains on the valley side, all the way down to the Vindelälven river. The surrounding countryside is hilly and the bedrock consists mainly of young granite

 

 

The Cinnamon Rose, a rarity in other parts of Västerbotten, grows in several places along the banks of the river. It is rich in vitamin C and it's hip fruits are used to make Rosehip soup.

 

From the early 1800's to the 1960's, the Vindelälven was an important transportation artery for the logging industry, being used to float timber from inland forests downstream using the current of the river. There remains fascinating evidence of those days in the area, with several stone and timber features known as 'flash dams' and 'driving dams' which were used to control the flow of water for the log drivers. The preservation of these features is of great historical value and provides another perspective of life in this area to compliment the natural beauty.

On some islands in the area you can still see evidence of previous forest fires, but it has been a long time since the last fire and it is now hard to find these signs due to the success of the new growth.

On some islands in the area you can still see evidence of previous forest fires, but it has been a long time since the last fire and it is now hard to find these signs due to the success of the new growth.

 

The Spruce trees in the more fertile parts of the islands are an impressive size. Several overgrown tree stumps testify that the forest has previously been logged. The amount of dead standing trees is consistently small, but likely to increase with the success of new growth. In the central part of the nature preserve, the stately pine tree still reigns.